Biker Dad

Dad to the Bone

NEED HELP AFTER A MOTORCYCLE CRASH IN CENTRAL FLORIDA? CALL WHITTEL AND MELTON

The Volusia County Sheriff’s Office posted to Facebook: “Sad to report a motorcyclist was killed Friday night in a crash with a vehicle that turned in front of him in Deltona.

The fatal crash was reported just after 6 p.m. Friday on Providence Boulevard, where a southbound minivan making a left turn onto Murphy Avenue turned into the path of the northbound motorcycle.

The motorcycle struck the rear passenger side of the van. The motorcyclist, 22-year-old Antonio E. Brown of Deltona, was pronounced deceased on scene. He was wearing a full face helmet.

The driver of the minivan was not injured and remained on scene. There were no signs of impairment detected during the initial phase of the investigation, which is active.

Charges are pending the outcome of a thorough crash investigation.”

One family member posted on Facebook, “Still in disbelief. Can’t believe this was you nephew.. Rest In Paradise baby boy.”

LETHAL LEFT TURNS:

The U.S. Department of Transportation reports that only 6% of crossing-path crashes involve right turns, compared to 53% of left turns. The number of accidents has virtually doubled! To put it another way, turning left at an intersection is MORE DANGEROUS than turning right at the same intersection. The most obvious benefit is that right-turning drivers are spared from having to cross any oncoming lanes of traffic. Therefore, when making a left turn, motorcycle drivers must be alert not just to approaching traffic in the opposing lane but also to their left to make sure no one is attempting to pass them on the left in their own lane.

Drivers frequently admit after an accident that they were honest when they said, “I didn’t even notice the motorbike when I turned in front of it.” The “left turn problem” has a significant impact on depth perception. A typical commuter may encounter several thousand cars in a day, but other drivers don’t perceive motorcycles the same way they see other cars and trucks. They see how many motorcycles. One? Two? Ten? Whatever number it is, it’s a very small part of the daily driving experience. In addition, due to their size, motorcycles tend to blend in to their surroundings, and it is much harder to see and judge their speed when turning in front of them.

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